The uncompromising Python code formatter

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The Uncompromising Code Formatter

Build Status Actions Status Actions Status Documentation Status Coverage Status License: MIT PyPI Downloads conda-forge Code style: black

“Any color you like.”

Black is the uncompromising Python code formatter. By using it, you agree to cede control over minutiae of hand-formatting. In return, Black gives you speed, determinism, and freedom from pycodestyle nagging about formatting. You will save time and mental energy for more important matters.

Blackened code looks the same regardless of the project you're reading. Formatting becomes transparent after a while and you can focus on the content instead.

Black makes code review faster by producing the smallest diffs possible.

Try it out now using the Black Playground. Watch the PyCon 2019 talk to learn more.


Contents: Installation and usage | Code style | Pragmatism | pyproject.toml | Editor integration | blackd | black-primer | Version control integration | GitHub Actions | Ignoring unmodified files | Used by | Testimonials | Show your style | Contributing | Change log | Authors


Installation and usage

Installation

Black can be installed by running pip install black. It requires Python 3.6.0+ to run but you can reformat Python 2 code with it, too.

Install from GitHub

If you can't wait for the latest hotness and want to install from GitHub, use:

pip install git+git://github.com/psf/black

Usage

To get started right away with sensible defaults:

black {source_file_or_directory}

You can run Black as a package if running it as a script doesn't work:

python -m black {source_file_or_directory}

Command line options

Black doesn't provide many options. You can list them by running black --help:

Usage: black [OPTIONS] [SRC]...

  The uncompromising code formatter.

Options:
  -c, --code TEXT                 Format the code passed in as a string.
  -l, --line-length INTEGER       How many characters per line to allow.
                                  [default: 88]

  -t, --target-version [py27|py33|py34|py35|py36|py37|py38|py39]
                                  Python versions that should be supported by
                                  Black's output. [default: per-file auto-
                                  detection]

  --pyi                           Format all input files like typing stubs
                                  regardless of file extension (useful when
                                  piping source on standard input).

  -S, --skip-string-normalization
                                  Don't normalize string quotes or prefixes.
  -C, --skip-magic-trailing-comma
                                  Don't use trailing commas as a reason to
                                  split lines.

  --check                         Don't write the files back, just return the
                                  status.  Return code 0 means nothing would
                                  change.  Return code 1 means some files
                                  would be reformatted. Return code 123 means
                                  there was an internal error.

  --diff                          Don't write the files back, just output a
                                  diff for each file on stdout.

  --color / --no-color            Show colored diff. Only applies when
                                  `--diff` is given.

  --fast / --safe                 If --fast given, skip temporary sanity
                                  checks. [default: --safe]

  --include TEXT                  A regular expression that matches files and
                                  directories that should be included on
                                  recursive searches.  An empty value means
                                  all files are included regardless of the
                                  name.  Use forward slashes for directories
                                  on all platforms (Windows, too).  Exclusions
                                  are calculated first, inclusions later.
                                  [default: \.pyi?$]

  --exclude TEXT                  A regular expression that matches files and
                                  directories that should be excluded on
                                  recursive searches.  An empty value means no
                                  paths are excluded. Use forward slashes for
                                  directories on all platforms (Windows, too).
                                  Exclusions are calculated first, inclusions
                                  later.  [default: /(\.direnv|\.eggs|\.git|\.
                                  hg|\.mypy_cache|\.nox|\.tox|\.venv|\.svn|_bu
                                  ild|buck-out|build|dist)/]

  --force-exclude TEXT            Like --exclude, but files and directories
                                  matching this regex will be excluded even
                                  when they are passed explicitly as
                                  arguments.

  --stdin-filename TEXT           The name of the file when passing it through
                                  stdin. Useful to make sure Black will
                                  respect --force-exclude option on some
                                  editors that rely on using stdin.

  -q, --quiet                     Don't emit non-error messages to stderr.
                                  Errors are still emitted; silence those with
                                  2>/dev/null.

  -v, --verbose                   Also emit messages to stderr about files
                                  that were not changed or were ignored due to
                                  --exclude=.

  --version                       Show the version and exit.
  --config FILE                   Read configuration from FILE path.
  -h, --help                      Show this message and exit.

Black is a well-behaved Unix-style command-line tool:

  • it does nothing if no sources are passed to it;
  • it will read from standard input and write to standard output if - is used as the filename;
  • it only outputs messages to users on standard error;
  • exits with code 0 unless an internal error occurred (or --check was used).

Using Black with other tools

While Black enforces formatting that conforms to PEP 8, other tools may raise warnings about Black's changes or will overwrite Black's changes. A good example of this is isort. Since Black is barely configurable, these tools should be configured to neither warn about nor overwrite Black's changes.

Actual details on Black compatible configurations for various tools can be found in compatible_configs.

Migrating your code style without ruining git blame

A long-standing argument against moving to automated code formatters like Black is that the migration will clutter up the output of git blame. This was a valid argument, but since Git version 2.23, Git natively supports ignoring revisions in blame with the --ignore-rev option. You can also pass a file listing the revisions to ignore using the --ignore-revs-file option. The changes made by the revision will be ignored when assigning blame. Lines modified by an ignored revision will be blamed on the previous revision that modified those lines.

So when migrating your project's code style to Black, reformat everything and commit the changes (preferably in one massive commit). Then put the full 40 characters commit identifier(s) into a file.

# Migrate code style to Black
5b4ab991dede475d393e9d69ec388fd6bd949699

Afterwards, you can pass that file to git blame and see clean and meaningful blame information.

$ git blame important.py --ignore-revs-file .git-blame-ignore-revs
7a1ae265 (John Smith 2019-04-15 15:55:13 -0400 1) def very_important_function(text, file):
abdfd8b0 (Alice Doe  2019-09-23 11:39:32 -0400 2)     text = text.lstrip()
7a1ae265 (John Smith 2019-04-15 15:55:13 -0400 3)     with open(file, "r+") as f:
7a1ae265 (John Smith 2019-04-15 15:55:13 -0400 4)         f.write(formatted)

You can even configure git to automatically ignore revisions listed in a file on every call to git blame.

$ git config blame.ignoreRevsFile .git-blame-ignore-revs

The one caveat is that GitHub and GitLab do not yet support ignoring revisions using their native UI of blame. So blame information will be cluttered with a reformatting commit on those platforms. (If you'd like this feature, there's an open issue for GitLab and please let GitHub know!)

NOTE: This is a beta product

Black is already successfully used by many projects, small and big. It also sports a decent test suite. However, it is still very new. Things will probably be wonky for a while. This is made explicit by the "Beta" trove classifier, as well as by the "b" in the version number. What this means for you is that until the formatter becomes stable, you should expect some formatting to change in the future. That being said, no drastic stylistic changes are planned, mostly responses to bug reports.

Also, as a temporary safety measure, Black will check that the reformatted code still produces a valid AST that is equivalent to the original. This slows it down. If you're feeling confident, use --fast.

The Black code style

Black is a PEP 8 compliant opinionated formatter. Black reformats entire files in place. It is not configurable. It doesn't take previous formatting into account. Your main option of configuring Black is that it doesn't reformat blocks that start with # fmt: off and end with # fmt: on. # fmt: on/off have to be on the same level of indentation. To learn more about Black's opinions, to go the_black_code_style.

Please refer to this document before submitting an issue. What seems like a bug might be intended behaviour.

Pragmatism

Early versions of Black used to be absolutist in some respects. They took after its initial author. This was fine at the time as it made the implementation simpler and there were not many users anyway. Not many edge cases were reported. As a mature tool, Black does make some exceptions to rules it otherwise holds. This section of the_black_code_style describes what those exceptions are and why this is the case.

Please refer to this document before submitting an issue just like with the document above. What seems like a bug might be intended behaviour.

pyproject.toml

Black is able to read project-specific default values for its command line options from a pyproject.toml file. This is especially useful for specifying custom --include and --exclude patterns for your project.

Pro-tip: If you're asking yourself "Do I need to configure anything?" the answer is "No". Black is all about sensible defaults.

What on Earth is a pyproject.toml file?

PEP 518 defines pyproject.toml as a configuration file to store build system requirements for Python projects. With the help of tools like Poetry or Flit it can fully replace the need for setup.py and setup.cfg files.

Where Black looks for the file

By default Black looks for pyproject.toml starting from the common base directory of all files and directories passed on the command line. If it's not there, it looks in parent directories. It stops looking when it finds the file, or a .git directory, or a .hg directory, or the root of the file system, whichever comes first.

If you're formatting standard input, Black will look for configuration starting from the current working directory.

You can also explicitly specify the path to a particular file that you want with --config. In this situation Black will not look for any other file.

If you're running with --verbose, you will see a blue message if a file was found and used.

Please note blackd will not use pyproject.toml configuration.

Configuration format

As the file extension suggests, pyproject.toml is a TOML file. It contains separate sections for different tools. Black is using the [tool.black] section. The option keys are the same as long names of options on the command line.

Note that you have to use single-quoted strings in TOML for regular expressions. It's the equivalent of r-strings in Python. Multiline strings are treated as verbose regular expressions by Black. Use [ ] to denote a significant space character.

Example pyproject.toml
[tool.black]
line-length = 88
target-version = ['py37']
include = '\.pyi?$'
exclude = '''
# A regex preceded with ^/ will apply only to files and directories
# in the root of the project.
^/(
  (
      \.eggs         # exclude a few common directories in the
    | \.git          # root of the project
    | \.hg
    | \.mypy_cache
    | \.tox
    | \.venv
    | _build
    | buck-out
    | build
    | dist
  )/
  | foo.py           # also separately exclude a file named foo.py in
                     # the root of the project
)
'''

Lookup hierarchy

Command-line options have defaults that you can see in --help. A pyproject.toml can override those defaults. Finally, options provided by the user on the command line override both.

Black will only ever use one pyproject.toml file during an entire run. It doesn't look for multiple files, and doesn't compose configuration from different levels of the file hierarchy.

Editor integration

Black can be integrated into many editors with plugins. They let you run Black on your code with the ease of doing it in your editor. To get started using Black in your editor of choice, please see editor_integration.

Patches are welcome for editors without an editor integration or plugin! More information can be found in editor_integration.

blackd

blackd is a small HTTP server that exposes Black's functionality over a simple protocol. The main benefit of using it is to avoid paying the cost of starting up a new Black process every time you want to blacken a file. Please refer to blackd to get the ball rolling.

black-primer

black-primer is a tool built for CI (and humans) to have Black --check a number of (configured in primer.json) Git accessible projects in parallel. black_primer has more information regarding its usage and configuration.

(A PR adding Mercurial support will be accepted.)

Version control integration

Use pre-commit. Once you have it installed, add this to the .pre-commit-config.yaml in your repository:

repos:
  - repo: https://github.com/psf/black
    rev: 20.8b1 # Replace by any tag/version: https://github.com/psf/black/tags
    hooks:
      - id: black
        language_version: python3 # Should be a command that runs python3.6+

Then run pre-commit install and you're ready to go.

Avoid using args in the hook. Instead, store necessary configuration in pyproject.toml so that editors and command-line usage of Black all behave consistently for your project. See Black's own pyproject.toml for an example.

If you're already using Python 3.7, switch the language_version accordingly. Finally, stable is a branch that tracks the latest release on PyPI. If you'd rather run on master, this is also an option.

GitHub Actions

Create a file named .github/workflows/black.yml inside your repository with:

name: Lint

on: [push, pull_request]

jobs:
  lint:
    runs-on: ubuntu-latest
    steps:
      - uses: actions/[email protected]
      - uses: actions/[email protected]
      - uses: psf/[email protected]
        with:
          black_args: ". --check"

Inputs

black_args

optional: Black input arguments. Defaults to . --check --diff.

Ignoring unmodified files

Black remembers files it has already formatted, unless the --diff flag is used or code is passed via standard input. This information is stored per-user. The exact location of the file depends on the Black version and the system on which Black is run. The file is non-portable. The standard location on common operating systems is:

  • Windows: C:\\Users\<username>\AppData\Local\black\black\Cache\<version>\cache.<line-length>.<file-mode>.pickle
  • macOS: /Users/<username>/Library/Caches/black/<version>/cache.<line-length>.<file-mode>.pickle
  • Linux: /home/<username>/.cache/black/<version>/cache.<line-length>.<file-mode>.pickle

file-mode is an int flag that determines whether the file was formatted as 3.6+ only, as .pyi, and whether string normalization was omitted.

To override the location of these files on macOS or Linux, set the environment variable XDG_CACHE_HOME to your preferred location. For example, if you want to put the cache in the directory you're running Black from, set XDG_CACHE_HOME=.cache. Black will then write the above files to .cache/black/<version>/.

Used by

The following notable open-source projects trust Black with enforcing a consistent code style: pytest, tox, Pyramid, Django Channels, Hypothesis, attrs, SQLAlchemy, Poetry, PyPA applications (Warehouse, Bandersnatch, Pipenv, virtualenv), pandas, Pillow, every Datadog Agent Integration, Home Assistant.

The following organizations use Black: Facebook, Dropbox, Mozilla, Quora.

Are we missing anyone? Let us know.

Testimonials

Dusty Phillips, writer:

Black is opinionated so you don't have to be.

Hynek Schlawack, creator of attrs, core developer of Twisted and CPython:

An auto-formatter that doesn't suck is all I want for Xmas!

Carl Meyer, Django core developer:

At least the name is good.

Kenneth Reitz, creator of requests and pipenv:

This vastly improves the formatting of our code. Thanks a ton!

Show your style

Use the badge in your project's README.md:

[![Code style: black](https://img.shields.io/badge/code%20style-black-000000.svg)](https://github.com/psf/black)

Using the badge in README.rst:

.. image:: https://img.shields.io/badge/code%20style-black-000000.svg
    :target: https://github.com/psf/black

Looks like this: Code style: black

License

MIT

Contributing to Black

In terms of inspiration, Black is about as configurable as gofmt. This is deliberate.

Bug reports and fixes are always welcome! However, before you suggest a new feature or configuration knob, ask yourself why you want it. If it enables better integration with some workflow, fixes an inconsistency, speeds things up, and so on - go for it! On the other hand, if your answer is "because I don't like a particular formatting" then you're not ready to embrace Black yet. Such changes are unlikely to get accepted. You can still try but prepare to be disappointed.

More details can be found in CONTRIBUTING.

Change log

The log's become rather long. It moved to its own file.

See CHANGES.

Authors

Glued together by Łukasz Langa.

Maintained with Carol Willing, Carl Meyer, Jelle Zijlstra, Mika Naylor, Zsolt Dollenstein, and Cooper Lees.

Multiple contributions by:

Comments
  • Non-prerelease black release

    Non-prerelease black release

    It looks like Black is stable enough at the moment to release it as stable to PyPI. There are plenty of tools and integrations already which rely on black package and the fact that it is still in prerelease state sometime causes inconveniences, i.e. using it with pipenv forces allow_prereleases flag to be set to true.

  • [Feature Request] Optimize imports

    [Feature Request] Optimize imports

    Can we please have a feature, similar to PyCharm's "optimize imports" feature, which basically sorts and removes un-used import statements?

    P.S. Great work!, Black works like a charm for me.

  • "INTERNAL ERROR: Black produced different code on the second pass of the formatter"

    • Version: 20.8b0
    • OS and Python version: all

    This is a rare problem that we're currently investigating. The most common case of it has to do with a combination of magic trailing commas and optional parentheses. Long story short, there's this behavior:

    • Black now treats all pre-existing trailing magic commas found in bracket pairs as signal to explode that bracket pair (e.g. to format it "one element per line");
    • in other places Black inserts trailing commas itself after reformatting a long expression or statement;
    • then on another run, Black finds those trailing commas and treats them as pre-existing trailing commas that signal that the given bracket pair should be exploded.

    The expected behavior is that there should be no difference between the first formatting and the second formatting. In practice Black sometimes chooses for or against optional parentheses differently depending on whether the line should be exploded or not. This is what needs fixing.

    Workaround

    We're working on fixing this, until then, format the file twice with --fast, it will keep its formatting moving forward.

    Call To Action

    If you find a case of this, please attach the generated log here so we can investigate. We've already added three identifying examples of this as expected failures to https://github.com/psf/black/pull/1627/commits/25206d8cc6e98143f0b10bcbe9e8b41b8b543abe.

    Finally, if you're interested in debugging this yourself, look for should_explode in if statements in the Black codebase. Those are the decisions that lead to unstable formatting.

  • Single quotes option

    Single quotes option

    Hi! Although Black now prefers doubles, can we have an option to keep single quotes? Forcing double quotes would make this great project unusable for many users who picked the rule of using single quotes.

    Operating system: MacOS Python version: 3.6 Black version: 18.4a0 Does also happen on master: yes

  • Black should have an opinion about doc strings

    Black should have an opinion about doc strings

    Operating system: Ubuntu 16.04 Python version: 3.6.1 Black version: master Does also happen on master: yes

    Hi,

    currently Black doesn't seem to have an opinion about doc strings or rather where the quotes should go.

    Black claims for this file for example that it is already formatted:

    def test():
        """This is one possibility.
    
        Very important stuff here.
        """
    
    
    def test2():
        """This is another one possibility.
    
        Very important stuff here."""
    
    
    def test3():
        """
        This is another one possibility.
    
        Very important stuff here.
        """
    
    
    def test4():
        """
        What about this?
        """
    
    
    def test5():
        """What about this?
    
        Some people also like to have an empty line at the end of the doc string.
    
        """
    

    The tool pydocstyle (in the spirit of PEP-0257) at least complains that the closing quotes should go on a separate line and if the docstring fits one line it should only span one line.

    It would be nice if that could be incorporated in Black as well.

    Thanks for the great work!

    Lukas.

  • tweak collection literals to explode with trailing comma

    tweak collection literals to explode with trailing comma

    This is a change I discussed with @ambv at PyCon - the commit sequence should make things clear. I didn't go to the effort of fixing up existing tests (they'll fail a lot right now), but I can if this looks like a valid approach. This is somewhere between "proof of concept" and something I'd feel happy about, but I wanted feedback on how I'm tackling this early in development since I'm very much noideadog on this code.

  • Finish

    Finish "magic trailing comma" handling

    #826 introduced the concept of a magic trailing comma: if you, the programmer, explicitly put a trailing comma in a collection, it signals to Black that you want a given collection exploded into multiple lines, always. While this flies a bit in the way of "doesn't look at pre-existing formatting" and "non-configurability", it is extremely pragmatic and consistent with "make diffs as small as possible".

    However, there's issues with it so far. It doesn't yet work on nested collections. Worse yet, in those cases it leaves trailing commas behind when a collection ends up compressed into one line. We need to fix those edge cases to make it generally dependable.

  • Black violates pep8 recommendation with long argument list

    Black violates pep8 recommendation with long argument list

    Currently, black reformats long routine names as follow

    # in:
    
    def very_important_function(template: str, *variables, file: os.PathLike, engine: str, header: bool = True, debug: bool = False):
        """Applies `variables` to the `template` and writes to `file`."""
        with open(file, 'w') as f:
            ...
    
    # out:
    
    def very_important_function(
        template: str,
        *variables,
        file: os.PathLike,
        engine: str,
        header: bool = True,
        debug: bool = False,
    ):
        """Applies `variables` to the `template` and writes to `file`."""
        with open(file, "w") as f:
    

    Desired style

    The current style done by black violates pep8 recommendation

    # Add 4 spaces (an extra level of indentation) to distinguish arguments from the rest.
    def long_function_name(
            var_one, var_two, var_three,
            var_four):
        print(var_one)
    

    The logic and motivation behind pep8 formatting, and against black, is that one wants to keep the indentation of the function definition continuation at a different level compared to the logic block. Otherwise, it's harder to differentiate what's one and what's the other, despite the indented frowny face.

    In fact, flake8 reports a pep8 violation for a case such as this

        if path.suffix in (
            '.js', '.json'
            ):
            proto = Protocol.json
    
    x.py:20:5: E125 continuation line with same indent as next logical line
    

    Black current formatting would be equivalent to this

        if path.suffix in (
            '.js', '.json'
        ):
            proto = Protocol.json
    

    Which we can probably all agree is a bad idea.

    Additional context from python-ideas mailing list

  • Black does not honor exclude regex when files explicitly listed on the command line

    Black does not honor exclude regex when files explicitly listed on the command line

    Operating system: OSX Python version: 3.6.2 Black version: black, version 18.6b4

    The problem: certain directories in our repo contain generated python code that we don't want black to change. We've configure our repo to run black via pre-commit. Pre-commit invokes black with a list of changed files on the command line, and black's exclude regex does not work against those files and paths.

    i.e.

    black --exclude "/migrations/" content/migrations/0049_publicationstore_is_test.py
    reformatted content/migrations/0049_publicationstore_is_test.py
    All done! ✨ 🍰 ✨
    1 file reformatted.
    

    This makes us sad, since we've carefully put exclusion regexes into our pyproject.toml and black doesn't honor them when pre-commit calls it. Instead, we're having to workaround by configuring pre-commit to skip that path:

    repos:
    -   repo: https://github.com/ambv/black
        rev: stable
        hooks:
        - id: black
          language_version: python3.6
          exclude: migrations
    

    The behavior we'd like to see is that black's exclude regex would apply even when full file paths are listed on the commandline. I'd be happy to try for a PR if this seems like desirable behavior to anyone else...

  • Fluent interfaces

    Fluent interfaces

    Operating system: Mac OS Python version: 3.6.4 Black version: 18.3a3 Does also happen on master: yes


    Black removes trailing backlashes, which can be used, for instance with yapf, to signal "don't join these line".

    This is problematic, for instance, if one uses the "fluent interface" idiom, which can lead to long chains of attribute accesses in a given expression.

    Here's an example:

    -        return sa.sql \
    -            .select([sa.sql.func.count(membership.c.user_id)]) \
    -            .where(membership.c.group_id == cls.id) \
    -            .group_by(membership.c.group_id) \
    -            .label('members_count')
    +        return sa.sql.select([sa.sql.func.count(membership.c.user_id)]).where(
    +            membership.c.group_id == cls.id
    +        ).group_by(
    +            membership.c.group_id
    +        ).label(
    +            'members_count'
    +        )
    

    The easiest solution would be to keep the line break in the presence of a backslash.

  • Offer option other than pyproject.toml for config

    Offer option other than pyproject.toml for config

    https://github.com/pypa/pip/issues/6163 https://github.com/pypa/setuptools/issues/1642

    It seems that pyproject.toml is a trigger for enabling PEP 517 isolated builds. This seems a not good thing to tie to configuration of black. It broke pyinstaller and others with the pip-19.0 release.

  • Stop calling yourself

    Stop calling yourself "PEP 8 compliant"

    Is this related to a problem? Please describe.

    You like to call yourself "PEP 8 compliant", but at the same time you are definitely not:

    • line length:
      • #497
      • #498
      • #855
      • #1252
      • #1512
    • function's closing brackets:
      • #1178

    Describe the solution you'd like

    Now, unlike most people, I do not want you to change the style. I find the formatting quite nice, and the line length is also fine. But please, stop calling yourself PEP 8 compliant, it's just wrong.

    -_Black_ is a PEP 8 compliant opinionated formatter with its own style.
    +_Black_ is an almost PEP 8 compliant opinionated formatter with its own style.
    

    Describe alternatives you've considered

    I mean, the only alternative would be to change your style, but I don't consider it to be a correct solution. It's your opinion, and I respect it.

    Additional context

    Somewhat related to #1272.

  • Breaking `# pyright: ignore[]` used with `# type: ignore[]` comments on short lines

    Breaking `# pyright: ignore[]` used with `# type: ignore[]` comments on short lines

    Describe the style change

    When validating a project with both pyright and mypy, it's possible to independently validate both checkers. (since pyright 1.1.282) However, both expect their ignore comment to be at the start of the line.

    Examples in the current Black style

    line-lenght=130

    class Task(Future[_T_co], Generic[_T_co]):  # type: ignore[type-var]  # pyright: ignore[reportGeneralTypeIssues]
     # [...]
     pass
    

    Desired style

    class Task(  # type: ignore[type-var]
        Future[_T_co], Generic[_T_co]  # pyright: ignore[reportGeneralTypeIssues]
    ):
     # [...]
     pass
    

    Additional context

    https://github.com/microsoft/pyright/issues/4243 https://github.com/microsoft/pyright/issues/4259 https://github.com/python/mypy/issues/12358 https://github.com/python/mypy/issues/6948

  • Add an option to dereference symlinks

    Add an option to dereference symlinks

    Is your feature request related to a problem? Please describe.

    I'm trying to integrate black into a bazel project, run as a bazel test, to check python formatting at precommit. For sandboxing reasons, bazel tests don't run on the source files directly, but on a special output directory with symlinks to the source files. However, black skips symlinks, so it skips all the files and reports success, without actually having checked any of the files.

    Describe the solution you'd like

    A new option, so that black treats a symlink /a/b that points to file /b/a as a regular file /a/b. Since this is an unusual situation, it would make sense for the option to be off by default, so the existing behaviour doesn't change.

    As far as I can see, bazel only creates symlinks to files, not directories, so I have no opinion on how directory symlinks are treated.

    Describe alternatives you've considered

    Not checking formatting at precommit.

    Additional context

    Bazel output directory format: https://bazel.build/remote/output-directories

  • make black[jupyter] installation cross-shell

    make black[jupyter] installation cross-shell

    Description

    Checklist - did you ...

    • [ ] Add an entry in CHANGES.md if necessary?
    • [ ] Add / update tests if necessary?
    • [ ] Add new / update outdated documentation?

    Looks like https://github.com/psf/black/pull/3254#issuecomment-1236197864 went stale, so here's a PR to fix the installation instructions and make them cross-shell

  • Adding trailing commas to dictionaries when comments are present

    Adding trailing commas to dictionaries when comments are present

    Fixes #3072

    Description

    Checklist - did you ...

    • [ ] Add an entry in CHANGES.md if necessary?
    • [x] Add / update tests if necessary?
    • [ ] Add new / update outdated documentation?
  • Adding pyproject.toml configuration output to verbose logging

    Adding pyproject.toml configuration output to verbose logging

    Fixes #3386

    Description

    Checklist - did you ...

    • [ ] Add an entry in CHANGES.md if necessary?
    • [ ] Add / update tests if necessary?
    • [ ] Add new / update outdated documentation?
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